My imaginary pets

I like pets. All kind of pets. When the kids were growing up, we had dogs and cats and birds. As the kids moved out and the pets crossed the rainbow bridge, I decided my time had come to enjoy other people’s pets. All my neighbors have dogs. And I have dog treats.

It started out as the occasional thing. I’d go out to water my plants and somehow the dogs knew and barked, ever so politely.

It’s now a daily routine. Each dog gets the exact same treat, regardless of size or how fast it makes it disappear.

I buy the treats at Trader Joe’s. Yes, I’m a real sucker for words like wholesome and natural and low fat…anyway, I’m up to three boxes of treats per Trader Joe’s trip.

And I tend to always end up with the same cashier, an old friend from a past life.

He packs my purchases in my reusable bag and he asks, “So, what kind of dog do you have these days?”

I stare at him like he’s batty, having already forgotten about the three boxes of treats.

He stares back, pulls out the doggie’s goodies, lines them up on the counter. I feel tempted to say those are my late night snacks, but I don’t.

I tell him about my newly found popularity. He nods and smiles…we’ll be friends in our next life, for sure.

9 Responses so far.

  1. Jeannie says:

    I’m the same way with the pets of others. I no longer have the energy to be a responsible pet owner, so I get my “critter fix” from the pets of friends and frequently get quite attached to them. They’ve become like grandchildren to me.

    Rather than spoil them with treats, I spoil them with attention. I stayed with some friends in CA a few years ago when one was recovering from an operation and wound up feeding and watering their two beautiful Russian Blues for them. I’m more of dog person but those two little dickens had me wrapped around their little toes. To this day, when I visit them, if their food bowl gets empty, I’m the one they come begging to.

    They’ve had other pets (cats and a dog) over the years I became quite attached to and I grieved as much as they did when their pets’ time came to cross the rainbow bridge.

    Another friend used to “complain” that her dog would pay more attention to me than to her when I would visit.

    My neighbor across the street from me used to babysit an adorable little cockapoo. Anytime I went outside my home and my neighbor was also outside with the dog, she (the dog) would walk to the curb at the end of the walk and quietly wait for me to come over and pet her while I chatted with my neighbor. Who could resist those pleading, big, brown eyes? She loved it when I scratched her behind the ears. I miss her now.

    • Jeannie says:

      I forgot to mention… If a cashier had asked me the same question you were asked, I definitely would have said they were for me and that they were delicious.

      • Jeannie, I’m convinced pets sense the people to pick. No doubt that they pick us. These days the animal kingdom feels like a much kinder place than the rest of the world. As always, thank you for sharing.

        • Jeannie says:

          That’s certainly true with cats. One doesn’t choose or own a cat (I have several friends who were adopted by strays). Dogs have owners but cats have staff.

          If people were more like our pets, the world would be a better place. I nominate little No Name for President!

          • Thanks Jeannie, my newest released is dedicated to her. She crossed the rainbow bridge in January, I still can’t handle talking about it, so I don’t. But I know you care.

        • Andrea Stoeckel says:

          Of course they do. My spouse’s Black Cocker Spaniel chose ME even before I chose her Momma…. and my late dapple dachshund Toby chose me by “marking me” when he came in from his coast to coast plane ride…bless his little heart

          • Jeannie says:

            It appears Dachshunds have a thing for marking. I used to baby sit a friend’s little dachshund and he insisted on marking the corner of my bed (and the bedspread0 while I was at work. It broke my heart to do it but I had to crate him while I was at work. He was a regular pain in the neck (they are high energy dogs that get bored easily) but I loved the scamp anyway. He was a lot of fun.

            I learned that if I wanted to get a full night’s sleep with no interruptions (those were the days!), I had to take him outside and play fetch with him until he was practically tripping over his tongue, then take him back inside and put him on the bed so he could burrow under the covers.

  2. Jeannie says:

    Oh no! I’m so sorry about little No Name! If there is anything I can do, just let me know. For now, here is a digital hug.